"Sitting on my porch swing that night I began to talk to the Creator even though I wasn’t even sure if I believed in the Creator.  I asked him if this was all there is to life.  I couldn’t connect with any kind of purpose in my life.  I asked Creator to lead me to a direction with meaning.  I wanted to serve a greater purpose than living just for myself."
- Debra LaFountaine, Ojibway

"Sitting on my porch swing that night I began to talk to the Creator even though I wasn’t even sure if I believed in the Creator.  I asked him if this was all there is to life.  I couldn’t connect with any kind of purpose in my life.  I asked Creator to lead me to a direction with meaning.  I wanted to serve a greater purpose than living just for myself."

- Debra LaFountaine, Ojibway

(Source: karyndenny.com)

(Source: karyndenny.com)

"I have walked in a mountain meadow bright with Indian paintbrush, lupine, and wild buckwheat, and I have seen high in the branches of a lodgepole pine the male pine grosbeak, round and rose-colored, its dark, striped wings nearly invisible in the soft, mottled light.  And the uppermost branches of the tree seemed very slowly to ride across the blue sky."
- N. Scott Momaday, The Way To Rainy Mountain

"I have walked in a mountain meadow bright with Indian paintbrush, lupine, and wild buckwheat, and I have seen high in the branches of a lodgepole pine the male pine grosbeak, round and rose-colored, its dark, striped wings nearly invisible in the soft, mottled light.  And the uppermost branches of the tree seemed very slowly to ride across the blue sky."

- N. Scott Momaday, The Way To Rainy Mountain

Tags: life love you me

I felt honored to be in this moment where I knew I was heading towards something great!

I felt honored to be in this moment where I knew I was heading towards something great!

Minstrel Show by Dennis Tibbetts (Objibwe/Shoshone)

Dear Grandfather Redsky: 

The university put on a Minstrel Show today.  The Chi-mookmaan held it in a stadium of 60,000 people.  The Anishinabe “The People” The old ones found a place, a place called White earth, it became sacred to “The People.”A place for ceremonies.

In the parking lot there were men with hairy chests, war whooping and jumping around, without spilling the drinks they carried in their hands.

The Anishinabe came from great distances, for the Warrior Ceremony. In old cars and pick-ups; parking near the forest. Throughout the night, there was dancing, songs, and drumming. They painted their white faces. They wore feathers in their hair. They bought little drums They carried toy tomahawks.

The Keeper of the Sacred Pipe, starts the ceremony. Tobacco, fur, feathers, wood, clay. Facing the four directions, praying the smoke will guide us to the truth.

They have an authentic white Indian. Impressive headdress, buckskins, and bare feet. An imposing warrior, who dances quite a dance, when the helmets scored a touchdown.

The sweat lodge was crowded with twelve men. Heated rocks and steam to purify these modern Anishinabe warriors. We are as one, as we feel the earth’s heat.

A band played a Hollywood Indian war song. It stirred their blood. They war whooped and chopped. Painted faces and feathered heads. An elder sang the warrior song:

A warrior is the one; who carries the burden of the bones of his people. A warrior is the one; to revenge the wrongs carries out on his people. A warrior is the one; who sacrifices his life for the existence of his people.

They tell me they honor us Grandfather by remembering our fierceness in battle. Powerful image makers, more powerful than cavalry bullets and soldiers’ bayonets.

Grandfather Redsky you taught me: how to believe in my essence, how to listen to the earth, how to sing the songs, how to soar. If not for that Grandfather Redsky, I could not bear this Minstrel Show.

afootballreport:

Louder than words: Brazilian graffiti clashes against the World Cup

While the protests that took place during last summer’s Confederations Cup were overwhelming and affecting, recent news out of Brazil suggests that what we saw last year might have only been a precursor to a larger movement set to convene just as the World Cup looks to kick off in less than two weeks. 

From teachers to doctors, artists to indigenous populations, the Brazilian population is once again uniting against a perceived neglect on the part of the Brazilian government. With taxpayer funds gone missing, local businesses shunned in favor of multinational conglomerates, and many Brazilians left in an unstable position as both housing costs and forceful evictions increase, Brazilians are angry, and rightfully so. 

But while last summer’s protests focused upon mass gatherings as a primary means to garner international attention, organizers and frustrated Barzilians have shifted tactics, utilizing a variety of platforms to spread their message. And what could be more arresting for visitors to Brazil than anti-World Cup graffiti in the cities hosting matches?

Here’s to Brazilians taking a stand and making their voices heard. In any way possible. [Posted by Maxi]

historicwomen:

Nora Thompson Dean 1907–1984
Nora Thompson Dean was a Lenape Native American traditionalist. Her birth name was Wenjipahkeehlehkwe which roughly translates to “touching leaves woman.”She was a native speaker of the Unami language and dedicated herself to the preservation of the language and her culture.
Nora was educated in Oklahoma public schools and graduated high school as salutatorian. Since she was raised according to Native customs, she appreciated and taught them. She instructed Lenape religious ceremonies, social functions, dances, craftwork, herbal medicines, and language. Dean became an influential member of her community. She received awards for her crafts work and met with government representatives for Native preservation. She lectured at various universities and recorded Lenape language lessons. An Oklahoma governor declared Nora an ambassador of goodwill.  
 

historicwomen:

Nora Thompson Dean 1907–1984

Nora Thompson Dean was a Lenape Native American traditionalist. Her birth name was Wenjipahkeehlehkwe which roughly translates to “touching leaves woman.”She was a native speaker of the Unami language and dedicated herself to the preservation of the language and her culture.

Nora was educated in Oklahoma public schools and graduated high school as salutatorian. Since she was raised according to Native customs, she appreciated and taught them. She instructed Lenape religious ceremonies, social functions, dances, craftwork, herbal medicines, and language. Dean became an influential member of her community. She received awards for her crafts work and met with government representatives for Native preservation. She lectured at various universities and recorded Lenape language lessons. An Oklahoma governor declared Nora an ambassador of goodwill.  

 

(Source: karyndenny.com)

invisiblestories:

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