When someone asks if I’m stressed

gradlifethrugifs:

(via confessionsofabrokegradstudent)

manpodcast:

This week’s Modern Art Notes Podcast features documentary filmmaker Dyanna Taylor and art historian and author Judith Zilczer. 

Taylor is the director of the forthcoming PBS "American Masters" documentary on the life and work of Dorothea Lange. Titled "Dorothea Lange: Grab a Hunk of Lightning," the film looks at Lange’s life from her upbringing outside New York City, to her emergence as a major American photographer. Lange is best-known for her work chronicling the Dust Bowl era, but her oeuvre includes much more, including pictures of Depression-era labor strife, the internment of Japanese-Americans and early environmentalist documentary photography. Such was Lange’s stature that just after she died in 1966 the Museum of Modern Art devoted just its sixth retrospective of a photographer’s career to her work. 

"Grab a Hunk of Lightning" premieres on PBS stations this Friday, August 29. Check your local listings to see if your PBS station is airing it at that time.

Taylor has won five Emmy awards for her work as a cinematographer and director of photography, and as also won a Peabody Award for the “American Masters” episode “Winter Dreams: F. Scott Fitzgerald.” She’s currently at work on a documentary about James Turrell and Roden Crater. Taylor also happens to be Lange and husband Paul Taylor’s granddaughter. 

The pictures here are pictures Lange made at Manzanar, one of the camps at which the federal government’s interned Japanese-Americans during World War II. 

Throughout the day MANPodcast.com will be featuring Lange’s images of and related to internment..

How to listen to this week’s show: Listen to or download this week’s program on SoundCloudvia direct-link mp3, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast (for free) at:

rjzimmerman:

Photos of the toxic crud after it flowed from the tailings pond at the Mount Polley Mine in British Columbia, into the Hazeltine Creek and then into Queznal Lake. The stuff in the water included arsenic, lead and mercury.

Here’s the link to an article in EcoWatch. The article includes a 35+ minute video of the site taken from a helicopter.

“Imagine a darkness so intense, and so complete that it is almost solid, flowing around you like ink, covering you like a velvet blanket.A blackness which cuts you off from the everyday world, which forces you to withdraw deep into yourself, which makes you see with your heart instead of your eyes.You can’t see, but your eyes are opened.You are isolated, but you know that you are part of the Great Spirit, united with all living beings.”
-Lame Deer, Brule Sioux Medicine Man                                                  from The World We Use To Live In: Remembering the Powers of Medicine Men, by Vine Deloria Jr. 

Imagine a darkness so intense, and so complete that it is almost solid, flowing around you like ink, covering you like a velvet blanket.A blackness which cuts you off from the everyday world, which forces you to withdraw deep into yourself, which makes you see with your heart instead of your eyes.You can’t see, but your eyes are opened.You are isolated, but you know that you are part of the Great Spirit, united with all living beings.”

-Lame Deer, Brule Sioux Medicine Man                                                  from The World We Use To Live In: Remembering the Powers of Medicine Men, by Vine Deloria Jr. 

(Source: karyndenny.com)

"Sitting on my porch swing that night I began to talk to the Creator even though I wasn’t even sure if I believed in the Creator.  I asked him if this was all there is to life.  I couldn’t connect with any kind of purpose in my life.  I asked Creator to lead me to a direction with meaning.  I wanted to serve a greater purpose than living just for myself."
- Debra LaFountaine, Ojibway

"Sitting on my porch swing that night I began to talk to the Creator even though I wasn’t even sure if I believed in the Creator.  I asked him if this was all there is to life.  I couldn’t connect with any kind of purpose in my life.  I asked Creator to lead me to a direction with meaning.  I wanted to serve a greater purpose than living just for myself."

- Debra LaFountaine, Ojibway

(Source: karyndenny.com)

(Source: karyndenny.com)

"I have walked in a mountain meadow bright with Indian paintbrush, lupine, and wild buckwheat, and I have seen high in the branches of a lodgepole pine the male pine grosbeak, round and rose-colored, its dark, striped wings nearly invisible in the soft, mottled light.  And the uppermost branches of the tree seemed very slowly to ride across the blue sky."
- N. Scott Momaday, The Way To Rainy Mountain

"I have walked in a mountain meadow bright with Indian paintbrush, lupine, and wild buckwheat, and I have seen high in the branches of a lodgepole pine the male pine grosbeak, round and rose-colored, its dark, striped wings nearly invisible in the soft, mottled light.  And the uppermost branches of the tree seemed very slowly to ride across the blue sky."

- N. Scott Momaday, The Way To Rainy Mountain

Tags: life love you me

I felt honored to be in this moment where I knew I was heading towards something great!

I felt honored to be in this moment where I knew I was heading towards something great!

Minstrel Show by Dennis Tibbetts (Objibwe/Shoshone)

Dear Grandfather Redsky: 

The university put on a Minstrel Show today.  The Chi-mookmaan held it in a stadium of 60,000 people.  The Anishinabe “The People” The old ones found a place, a place called White earth, it became sacred to “The People.”A place for ceremonies.

In the parking lot there were men with hairy chests, war whooping and jumping around, without spilling the drinks they carried in their hands.

The Anishinabe came from great distances, for the Warrior Ceremony. In old cars and pick-ups; parking near the forest. Throughout the night, there was dancing, songs, and drumming. They painted their white faces. They wore feathers in their hair. They bought little drums They carried toy tomahawks.

The Keeper of the Sacred Pipe, starts the ceremony. Tobacco, fur, feathers, wood, clay. Facing the four directions, praying the smoke will guide us to the truth.

They have an authentic white Indian. Impressive headdress, buckskins, and bare feet. An imposing warrior, who dances quite a dance, when the helmets scored a touchdown.

The sweat lodge was crowded with twelve men. Heated rocks and steam to purify these modern Anishinabe warriors. We are as one, as we feel the earth’s heat.

A band played a Hollywood Indian war song. It stirred their blood. They war whooped and chopped. Painted faces and feathered heads. An elder sang the warrior song:

A warrior is the one; who carries the burden of the bones of his people. A warrior is the one; to revenge the wrongs carries out on his people. A warrior is the one; who sacrifices his life for the existence of his people.

They tell me they honor us Grandfather by remembering our fierceness in battle. Powerful image makers, more powerful than cavalry bullets and soldiers’ bayonets.

Grandfather Redsky you taught me: how to believe in my essence, how to listen to the earth, how to sing the songs, how to soar. If not for that Grandfather Redsky, I could not bear this Minstrel Show.

afootballreport:

Louder than words: Brazilian graffiti clashes against the World Cup

While the protests that took place during last summer’s Confederations Cup were overwhelming and affecting, recent news out of Brazil suggests that what we saw last year might have only been a precursor to a larger movement set to convene just as the World Cup looks to kick off in less than two weeks. 

From teachers to doctors, artists to indigenous populations, the Brazilian population is once again uniting against a perceived neglect on the part of the Brazilian government. With taxpayer funds gone missing, local businesses shunned in favor of multinational conglomerates, and many Brazilians left in an unstable position as both housing costs and forceful evictions increase, Brazilians are angry, and rightfully so. 

But while last summer’s protests focused upon mass gatherings as a primary means to garner international attention, organizers and frustrated Barzilians have shifted tactics, utilizing a variety of platforms to spread their message. And what could be more arresting for visitors to Brazil than anti-World Cup graffiti in the cities hosting matches?

Here’s to Brazilians taking a stand and making their voices heard. In any way possible. [Posted by Maxi]